Pay Up: At Bottom Line

Pay Up: John Owes

John (*in his BLS debut*) and Fernando have borrowed money from the mafia, and enforcer Diego has arrived at their apartment to collect their weekly payment. Diego isn’t amused to find the in debt duo loafing around in their underwear; he is even less amused that the payment isn’t ready. While Fernando goes to gather up the money for the payment, Diego decides to teach John a lesson in manners and respect.

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Pay Up: John Owes

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Fastifex
Fastifex
2 months ago

Normally, mob enforcers maintain terror with victims ‘lucky’ enough not to be marked (yet?) for termination, by following up a single explicit warning with serious violent abuse, like breaking bones. Diego isn’t dumb enough to add vandalism, that only reduces the repayment-potential, and has a ‘most merciful’ reputation on account of using his trained medic know-how to inflict maximum pain with minimal long-term damage, even administering first aid himself, so victims are spared huge medical debts and can relatively rapidly resume working off their mob-debt. So he was picked by mob lord Ricardo for a special job of a more pedagogical nature : Sir’s grandson John isn’t raised at his luxurious manor, like other potential heirs, as his softy stepfather Stepan got full custody, presumably the -meanwhile terminated- family court judge’s revenge for his son’s OD death. Hence the knave wasn’t firmly raised to mob career profile, but allowed to turn into a nerdy shrimp would be-artist.
Ricardo made criminally sure Stepan’s firm went bankrupt, yet he didn’t liquidate the modest trust fund set up for John, who would have no further income, having missed out narrowly on a scholarship (which went to a loyal mobster’s son), hence eagerly signed up for a duo-shared room in the cheapest private dorm on campus, now also mob-owned. It was easy to arrange for some damages and a traffic accident to see the knave in debt with the mob, so Diego can enforce him, only for the mob dynasty’s and, presumably, his own good: credit terms are set ‘due to sponsor rules’ to force him to change major from fashion to economics, and demand good grades to win reprieves by extension and lower interest.
Because softy Stepan left it so long unspanked, crucial guidance may take a lot more CP then the usual mansion manner, and without custody -which Ricardo may re-apply for, now step-pa can’t properly provide- it may feel much meaner than a fledgling-fanny-flailing father-figure, but(t) given no other mob prince has John’s talent for number-crunching, a bright future is guaranteed, notably in the non-violent side of their business, legal even, abstraction made of the money laundering. Diego’s secret weapon is always around, helping him keep a keen eye on John: roommate Fernado, ironically the one whom the scholarship was stolen for, repays this as mob spy, luckily realizing John, who became a real mate, has much more to gain then he lost already, so cooperates as ‘tough love’ friend.